Understanding Cocaine and Chloridrate of Cocaine
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Mate de Coca.
Erythroxylum coca lam
NUTRITION FACTS
Serving size 1 coca tea bag (1gm)
Calories 0
% Daily Value
Total Fat
0
g
0
%
Calcium (Ca)
18.0
mg
2.3
%
Phosphorus (P)
6.4
mg
0.8
%
Magnesium (Mg)
2.1
mg
0.7
%
Potassium (K)
30.0
mg
1
%
Sodium (Na)
0.0
mg
0
%
Protein
0
g
0
%
Total Fat
0
g
0
%
Contains also 13 alkaloids: Papain, pectin, Globulin, Quinolin, Benzoin, Inulin, Reserpin and other substances still unknown.

According to extensive research

MATE DE COCA:

- CONTAINS MORE    PROTEINS (19.9%)
  THAN MEAT (19.4%)
- FAR MORE CALCIUM       (2,191%) THAN    CONDENSED MILK
- RICHER IN VITAMIN B-1   (276%) THAN FRESCH    CARROTS
- SATISFIED DIETARY   ALLOWANCE FOR   CALCIUM, IRON,
  OSPHOROUS, VITAMIN   A, B AND E.

PHYSICAL EFFECTS

The physical effects of MATE DE COCA are as follows

- INCREASED STAMINA.
- ABILITY TO GO LONG    PERIODS OF TIME    WITHOUT FOOD.
- BLOCKED SENSE OF    FATIGUE AND COLD.
- DECREASED NEED FOR   SLEEP.
- MOOD ELEVATION.

MATE DE COCA is a traditional remedy for:
- ALTITUDE OR    MOUNTAIN SICKNESS
- STRESS (excellent!!)
- TREATING    GASTROINTESTINAL    DISORDERS.
- ALLEVIATING    IRRITATION AND      INFECTION OF    THEVOCAL CORDS

   AND LARYNX
-  PREVENTING VERTIGO.
-  REGULATING ARTERIAL PRESSURE AND THE METABOLISM OF
   CARBOHYDRATES.

- ALLEVIATING DIARREA.
- IMPROVING SEXUAL PROWESS.
- RELIEVING COLDS, BRUISES, SORE JOINTS, MUSCLES.
- SWOLLEN FEET AND HEADACHES.

Alternative Medicine and  TheShaman and Ayayhuasca

Kidney Stones ?
Diabetes
. ?
Fatigue lack of Energy
Libido Problems.?

 

Discover the Secrets of the Ancient Peruvians
Mate Coca The Divine and Sacred Herb of the Incas

Mate de Coca is a popular herbal infusion, some times named
as CocaTeas,
is indeed an agreeable and invigorating mood-brightener.

How To Get High with Coca

Cocain VS Cocaine chlorhydrate

Cocaine it is a "natural alkaloid " found in the coca leaves, cocaine have many medicinal applications in the pharmaceutical industry, cocaine it is not addictive.

Chlorhydrate of Cocaine is is a "man made" substance obtained trough a chemical process it is danger because the addicitive properties.

An amazing herb strong because it s high content of nutrients minerals and vitamins, according Fernando Cabieses a distinguish Peruvian Neurologist and scientist.. The cocain alkaloid in a cup of mate coca it is only 0.05% it is pleasant and helpful but you cannot be a drug addict Because you drink a cup of mate de coca. The Mate de Coca have been used with success to suppress anxiety

IS COCA LEAVES A DAMN HERBAL OR A BLESSED PLANT

Well it is up to you But let me tell you that for over 3,000 years ac the andean people curators and shamans discover the curative and magical properties of the coca leaf in a small plant

Large industrialized nations found other applications for the coca leaves that are far from being benefical for health.

Today, as in Inca times, coca leaves are still an indispensable element in the Andean Religion; they are used in order to make the "k'intu" being part of different offerings for ancestral deities. They also serve for predicting the future by persons who act as "mediums" between the leaves and the interested person; the leaves are thrown over a shawl and the "medium" is in charge of interpreting them.

Coca leaves occupy a spot of preference in Andean popular medicine they are used as infusions, poultices or dusts. It is normal for Andean people to drink infusions of natural coca leaves for medicinal purposes as it is considered that they are very effective when people have dizziness or head aches, throat affections and stomach problems. It is drunk as soluble tea (MateCoca) by persons suffering from "soroche" or altitude sickness. It is also used as poultices in order to relieve rheumatism and bone dislocations. Even more, in many Andean highland Communities their adult populations are used to chewing coca leaves. The leaves are just chewed and not swallowed; for that they use some very small pieces of "llipta" in which a ball is made from ashes of some plants such as the quinua. The lime contained in those ashes helps release the leaves' alkaloids and elements such as carotene, thiamine, riboflavine, iron and calcium. More over, it is demonstrated that the llipta's lime helps for a strong degrading of the cocaine molecule. Chewing coca leaves serves as an stimulant able to mitigate conditions such as tiredness, hunger, thirst, etc. It is obvious that the person chewing coca leaves will not get "high" or a "dope" state because it is a question of natural leaves that would need a chemical process with elements such as tartic acid, pure clorhidric acid, ether, and anhydrous soda sulfate, in different determined temperatures, in order to finally produce cocaine. Coca leaves contain 14 alkaloids, from which the most popular and broadly used is just one: the cocaine; the other ones are wasted or simply ignored. There are innumerable beneficial products made from coca leaves: from candies, cigarettes, tooth pastes, drinks such as "Coca Cola" that since 1903 does not contain any coca, etc. Secondary effects of chewing coca leaves have also caused disputes that almost always have a political, cultural and even racial tone. In practice, it seems that it is much less harmful than smoking tobacco or drinking alcohol. Jose Angel Escalante when referring to the Quechuas says, " "That coca leaves make them idiot"...it could be, but, among thousands of Indians about two or three imbeciles are hardly found and all or almost all of them chew coca. Even more, it is not demonstrated that use of coca leaves is harmful.

Invigorating miracle coca leaves are! There is no any knowledge of any Indian having suffered from dyspepsia, having lost teeth or having gotten sick from them, before one hundred years old.".

The ecological level for cultivation of the coca bushes is found in the higher Andean Amazonian jungle, only in certain zones located at an altitude between 800 to 1800 mts. (2600 to 5900 ft.); in poor lands not using aqueducts. Officially its cultivation and trade are controlled by the Peruvian government by means of the Coca National Enterprise (ENACO) that must buy all the coca leaves produced in the country. That production will be used for legal sale for the population and the pharmaceutical industry.


Production of leaves for consumption by Andean people is small, its use and treatment are framed inside a cultural and anthropological field; while most of the production is aimed toward pharmaceutical affairs and trafficking

To obtain a few grams of cocaine the evil drug, is necessary to collect a large quantity coca leaves and process it using harmful chemicals.

But you can appreciate the benefits of the coca leaves just serving as an infusion in a cup of boiling water, of course there is a commercial soluble tea product available in the market.

Erythroxylon is the botanical name of the coca leaf and there is a full in deep study made by Antonio Brack Egg a Peruvian scientific biologist who devoted more than twenty years studying Peruvian native plants under the financial support of the United Nations Development Program and CBC (Centro de Estudios Reginales Andinos Bartolome de Las Casas.

Coca leaves might be useful as a natural treatment for; altitude illness, asthma, gastrointestinal ailments and motion sickness, high blood, as a fast-acting antidepressant, boost alertness, as a substitute stimulant for coffee in certain cases, and as an adjunct in programs of weight reduction and physical fitness (reduce the to anxiety of eating). In leaf form, coca does not produce toxicity or dependence. Its effects are distinct from those of cocaine (see references).

A whole extract of the leaf, include; alkaloids, natural flavors, and several nutrients vitamins A, B1, C, E, B12 potassium, magnesium Zinc copper Sodium, Phosphorous, Calcium Fiber, iron.

The Andean natives like to chew today coca (cacao) burning some coca leaves and mixing with fresh coca leaves wrapping a piece of lime forming a ball of coca leaves with the lime as the nucleus to obtain a chemical reaction together with the inner mouse fluids to support long hardworking periods without a need to eat or get tired

Of course if you arrive to Cusco to visit the Machu Pichu ruins you
Will be invited by the people of the region to take a cup of Coca tea for free and they will encourage to accept if you don't want to suffer the altitude illness and if you like to visit Hares you also will have the opportunity to try Coca Tea for free (of course if you like to try again they will charge for it).

References:

"My favorite beverage "By Dr Weils see http://www.drweils.com

The Incas and Coca leaves history.
http://www.PERUconnections.com


Who Put the COKE in Coca-cola.
There is an excellent abstract by © 1998 by Th. Metzger Artwork by Nick Bougas.

Dictionary of Useful Peruvian By © Antonio Brack Egg June 1999
Plants ISBN 9972-691-21-0

Atlanta Journal. "A Wonderful Medicine." March 10, 1885.
Freud, Sigmund. The Cocaine Papers. Ed. Robert Byck. (NY: Stonehill Press) 1974.
Kahn, E.J. The Big Drink. (NY: Random House) 1950.

Kennedy, Joseph. Coca Exotica. (Rutherford: Fairleigh Dickenson UN. Press) 1985.

Pendergrast, Mark. For God, Country and Coca-Cola. (NY: Scribners) 1993.

Watters, Pat. Coca-Cola: an Illustrated History. (Garden City, NY: Doubleday) 1978.l

Metzger is the author of The Birth Of Heroin And The Demonization Of The Dope Fiend. (Loompanics Unlimited, 1998.)

Want to learn more about the Coca ?

Mate de Coca it is a herbal tea with strong medicinal propeties fue to its contents the mate de coca is made of crushed coca leaves of the Coca plant (Erythroxylum). This tea has been used for over four thousand years by the andean people of South America.

Coca Leaf, are stil considered a sacred herb in the andean culture. It is only in this past century that the chemical configuration was changed to make the drug cocaine. Since then, the rest of the world has seen Coca as the raw material for the drug cocaine and not as the medicinal plant used for thousands of years. Coca was and is still used at every stage of the Andean peoples lives. Before giving birth, a woman drinks and chews Coca to hasten the labour and ease the pain. When a child is born, relatives celebrate by chewing the Coca leaf together. When a young man wants to marry a girl, he offers Coca to her father. And when somebody dies,

MateCoca is drunk at the wake and a small pile of leaves are placed in the coffin before burial. From ancient times, these rituals were considered sacred, and as such, the Coca leaf continues to have a great significance in the culture of the Andean people.

Since the Spanish conquerors identified it as one of the essential elements of the magical, religious and medicinal ritual of Andean tradition and as a factor that permitted the conquered Indians to maintain their cohesion and resistance, coca leaves has always been persecuted and combated as a "diabolic weed". Within the ethnocentric view of the European colonizers, the mysterious leaf employed in rituals and religious offerings to the Sun and Mother Earth hindered the conversion of the indigenous peoples to Christianism. The first adversaries of the coca plant appeared and proposed its straightforward eradication under the pretext of ensuring the salvation of indigenous souls.

By virtue of its properties in medicine, health and work, the traditional form of coca leaf consumption is neither harmful nor injurious to the organism, unlike caffeine, tannin and nicotine which have spread and achieved universal recognition. Throughout the centuries the coca leaf has been attacked and defended from all sides. It was attacked by the colonizers as part of a process of cultural alienation and by the Inquisition, behind which hid the ferocious appetites for gold, silver and all the wealth that slumbered in the depths of the Andes. Despite the inestimable contribution by the pre-Columbian civilizations to old Europe in the form of a number of valuable plants such as the potato, maize, the tomato, okra, cotton, the chili pepper, quinoa and certain varieties of bean, paradoxically coca is singled out for discrimination. However, the aboriginal peoples identify with the coca plant - a living expression of Andean culture - and by defending it they have always defended the rights of the Andean people to preserve their millennial traditions and values.

In contrast with growing alcohol and tobacco consumption, the traditional use of coca in its manifold forms is not and never has been a form of drug addiction, but a natural indigenous custom which it is possible to give up without producing any narcotic syndrome. No one can claim, in the absence of scientific proof to the contrary, that the Quechua and Aymara Indians, particularly in Peru and Bolivia, who have been chewing the Divine and Magic herb of their ancestors since time immemorial, have become drug addicts.

Consequently, the indigenous coca production populations have every reason to be indignant about the lack of logic in the contradictory arguments of the Western countries, which maintain that the perverse effects of the drug in their rich societies can be controlled without eradicating the economic, social and moral factors that have engendered one of the West's greatest scourges.

I also started to notice the more subtle aspects of the taste - I could taste the similarity it has to Coca Cola (which now uses de-cocanized coca leaves). When I first sip, I taste the green tea/leafy type taste, and then as I swallow, I taste the coca-cola type taste. It tastes good!

Coca leaves is a densely-leafed plant native to the eastern slopes of the Andes.Erythroxylon coca is widely cultivated in Peru. The leaves are rich in vitamins, protein, calcium,iron and fiber. Chewing coca also counters the symptoms of 'mountainsickness' and oxygen-deprivation.

Stictly speaking, the leaves aren't actually chewed.Typically, the dried coca leaf is moistened with saliva. The wad is placed between the gum and cheek and it is gently sucked. The invigorating juices are swallowed.

Shamans from some traditional andean people still smoke coca leaves for magical purposes. Inhaling the sacred vapours induces a trance-like state. Coca enables a shaman to cross 'the bridge of smoke', enter the world of spirits, and activate his magical powers. Alas the leaves don't travel well; and this ancient usage is uncommon in the urban industrial West


Actually the coca leaves are free used in the tradditional ceremonies by andean people.

The Empresa Nacional de La Coca produces filtrant teas an another products that use as a raw material the coca leaves.

Actually the Empresa Nacional de la Coca it is the only one business authorized by the Peruvian goverment to export large quantities of coca leaves to United States.

Coca leaves botanical names:

Eritroxilum coca lam
ERITROXILUM NOVO GRANATENSE:

At higher altitude better quality
----------------------------------------
December 23/30, 2000 Christmas miscellany
Freud, Sherlock Holmes and Coca Cola — the cocaine connection
By Ray Sturgess, MRPharmS

The two most significant figures in the cocaine story are world renowned, but not for their connection with cocaine. The individual responsible for the introduction of cocaine into medicine, albeit indirectly, went on to other and greater things, his life work fundamentally changing our views of ourselves and the world. The other did not even exist, although there are plenty of followers who behave as if he did.

If it is surprising how long it took for cocaine to find its way into medicine as an anaesthetic, the identity of the individual responsible for its introduction is startlingly more so. Even given the information that at the time —

The late 1880s Jewish doctor in Vienna, anxious to find some means of achieving fame and fortune. It is still something of a shock to learn that his name was Sigmund Freud.

In 1859 by an Italian neurologist, Paolo Montegazza, who had himself experimented with coca leaves and believed that they improved digestion and increased mental alertness and physical vigour.

The second report had just been published by a Dr Theodor Aschenbrandt describing how he had surreptitiously laced with cocaine the drinks of Bavarian soldiers on manoeuvres and shown that the drug increased physical endurance under strenuous conditions.

Freud may also have seen reports from the United States claiming the successful use of cocaine in the treatment of morphine addiction.

He was certainly interested in finding such a cure, since his friend Dr Ernst von Fleischl-Marxow was trying to rid himself of morphine addiction acquired when he had taken the drug to relieve the pain after a thumb amputation. Von Marxow had lent Freud money to embark on his medical career and Freud, not able to repay him, tried in return to help him by treating his addiction, and after less than a month of self-experimentation with cocaine, Freud put his friend on to the drug. Believing he was on to something big, Freud wrote to his fiancée, Martha Bernays, that he not only hoped to cure his friend, but, by demonstrating a novel use for cocaine in Europe, to gain fame and financial security so that they could marry.

Freud had become a cocaine convert and, convinced that the drug had cured his own depression and stomach cramps, and still seeing it as the means to fame and fortune, preached its benefits for heart disease and nervous exhaustion, apparently unperturbed that these conditions had not been mentioned in the published reports nor were likely to have been encountered in Aschenbrandt’s strapping soldiery.

It was after a visit to Martha and while he was still extolling the virtues of cocaine for a wide variety of conditions for which its value had not been — and never was — established, that Freud treated a colleague suffering from intestinal pain with a 5 per cent solution of the drug. When the friend reported to Freud that the solution had numbed his lips and tongue (it is not reported if it helped his bowel ache) a third colleague was present, ophthalmologist Carl Koller. Koller went straight back to his laboratory, prepared a solution of cocaine and instilled it into the eye of a frog, and found that after a short interval the animal’s eye was insensitive to touching with a probe or to the application of heat or electricity.

Koller went on to try cocaine in his own and his assistant’s eyes and realised that he had found an agent that was not only an effective analgesic in painful eye conditions but, more importantly, would produce the local anaesthesia required for eye surgery. Koller, always with an eye to the main chance, straightaway carried out eye operations following anaesthetisation with cocaine, and after publishing an account of his successes became internationally famous, being dubbed, in a humorous reference to the American soft drink, Coca Koller.

As was to happen with nitrous oxide, it was entrepreneurs who discovered the benefits of cocaine before the medical profession realised its potential. In 1863 in Paris, Angelo Mariani began selling his Vin Mariani, a tonic wine containing coca leaf extract.

It is difficult to think of a pharmacist who has become a household name (who now remembers Jesse Boot?), but perhaps John Styth Pemberton came nearest when he concocted a soft drink based on an extract of coca leaf in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1885. He had settled in the Georgia capital in 1869, following service as a cavalry troop leader during the Civil War, and was soon producing Triplex Liver Pills and Globe of Flower Cough Syrup, but he had to wait for success until he formulated his coca leaf drink, which he at first called French Wine Coca. Within a few months of its launch, Pemberton — who favoured the title Doctor — formed the Pemberton Chemical Company and recruited the services of Frank M. Robinson as book-keeper. Robinson was efficient at his job and had another invaluable talent: he soon had a reputation for analysing the constituents of a batch of syrup merely by sniffing it. Before he put his French Wine Coca on widespread sale, Pemberton modified it by taking out the wine and adding a pinch of caffeine. The resulting tonic tasted less than pleasant and Pemberton added kola nut extract and some oils as flavouring before starting production in a three-legged iron pot in his back yard, stirring the concoction with an oar. He changed the name to Coca Cola and launched it in 1886, the year which, as the present Coca Cola company directors like to point out, saw the unveiling of Sherlock Holmes and the Statue of Liberty.

Pemberton managed to sell only 25 gallons of Coca Cola syrup — distributed as a concentrate that was diluted and carbonated at the point of sale — in the first year, and in 1867 he sold a two thirds interest in the business to two druggists for $1,200, disposing of the remaining third (thereby forgoing his chance of really becoming a household name) the following year. Further changes of ownership led to the company being acquired by another pharmacist, Asa Griggs Candler, who in 1903 had second thoughts about selling a cocaine drink to millions of young Americans and decided that the cocaine had better be extracted from the coca leaves before they were put into the drink. It was more profitable too, since the extracted cocaine could be, and still is, sold to the pharmaceutical industry.
.
Bell’s explanation had been that the man was respectful but did not remove his hat, an army habit that would have gone by the board unless the man had been recently discharged. The man had an air of authority but not superiority, which indicated his non-com rank, and he was obviously Scottish. As to Barbados, his complaint was elephantiasis, a disease found in the West Indies but not in Britain.

The opium had become the drug of the masses, found in most homes as the standard remedy for diarrhoea, and the only effective analgesic (aspirin did not appear until 1897). By contrast, cocaine was at that time the drug of the smart set, the artistic and intellectual elite, a mental stimulant untarnished by the images of low-life depravity in smoke-laden dens associated with opium. Holmes’ addiction served one other valuable function: it made him appear flawed and the reader less overawed by his superiority. Cocaine addiction may not have been a laudable aspect of Holmes’s character, but by choosing it as the detective’s prime weakness, Doyle played something of a masterstroke.

Even when he had given up medicine for writing, Conan Doyle kept abreast of the developments in the medical profession and when, in the 1890s, the dangers of cocaine addiction began to receive publicity, Doyle responded by making Watson’s criticisms of Holmes’s habit, something he had always disapproved of, stronger and more reformist: "I gradually weaned him from that drug mania which had threatened once to check his remarkable career."Even Holmes, earlier having confessed his reliance on cocaine for stimulating and clarifying his mind, is made to say that he found his hypodermic syringe an instrument of evil. Not that the reading public were critical of Holmes’s addiction. All they wanted were more Holmes stories and when Doyle had Holmes killed off by Moriarty in ‘The adventure of the final problem’ there was a public outcry and 20,000 subscibers cancelled their orders for the Strand Magazine. When, eight years later, Doyle resurrected Holmes in ‘The hound of the Baskervilles’, the magazine’s circulation shot up by 30,000 and long queues formed outside the offices of the publishers and the nation’s newsagents. What mattered Holmes’s weakness for cocaine, the public reckoned, compared with the pleasure he gave?
Now that the full facts of cocaine addiction are known, we allow Holmes his idiosyncrasy, but for the world at large we can no longer take such a tolerant view.

Further reading

1. Gay P. Freud: A Life for Our Time. London: Dent; 1988.
2. Booth M. The doctor, the detective and Arthur Conan Doyle. London: Hodder; 1997.
3. Kahn EJ Jr. The big drink: an unofficial history of Coca Cola. London: Max Reinhardt; 1950.

Ray Sturgess is a pharmacist from Knaresborough, North Yorkshire, with experience in the pharmaceutical industry and in community pharmacy. He has now retired and writes on health-related matters


Mate Coca, contents:

Vitamins
Vitamin A............. 14.000 UI.
alfa carotene..................... ......2,65 mg.
B1 (tiamine)....... ...0,68 mg.
B2 (riboflavine).......1,73 mg.
B6 (piridoxine)........0,58 mg.
beta carotene..........................20 mg
C (ascorbic acid)....................53 mg.
E (tocoferol)............................44,1 mg.
Nicotinic acid.............................5.0 mg
H (biotine)................................. 0.54I.
-----------
G (niacine)

Since the Spanish conquerors identified it as one of the essential elements of the magical, religious and medicinal ritual of Andean tradition and as a factor that permitted the conquered Indians to maintain their cohesion and resistance, coca leaves has always been persecuted and combated as a "diabolic weed". Within the ethnocentric view of the European colonizers, the mysterious leaf employed in rituals and religious offerings to the Sun and Mother Earth hindered the conversion of the indigenous peoples to Christianism. The first adversaries of the coca plant appeared and proposed its straightforward eradication under the pretext of ensuring the salvation of indigenous souls.

By virtue of its properties in medicine, health and work, the traditional form of coca leaf consumption is neither harmful nor injurious to the organism, unlike caffeine, tannin and nicotine which have spread and achieved universal recognition. Throughout the centuries the coca leaf has been attacked and defended from all sides. It was attacked by the colonizers as part of a process of cultural alienation and by the Inquisition, behind which hid the ferocious appetites for gold, silver and all the wealth that slumbered in the depths of the Andes. Despite the inestimable contribution by the pre-Columbian civilizations to old Europe in the form of a number of valuable plants such as the potato, maize, the tomato, okra, cotton, the chili pepper, quinoa and certain varieties of bean, paradoxically coca is singled out for discrimination. However, the aboriginal peoples identify with the coca plant - a living expression of Andean culture - and by defending it they have always defended the rights of the Andean people to preserve their millennial traditions and values.

In contrast with growing alcohol and tobacco consumption, the traditional use of coca in its manifold forms is not and never has been a form of drug addiction, but a natural indigenous custom which it is possible to give up without producing any narcotic syndrome. No one can claim, in the absence of scientific proof to the contrary, that the Quechua and Aymara Indians, particularly in Peru and Bolivia, who have been chewing the Divine and Magic herb of their ancestors since time immemorial, have become drug addicts.

Consequently, the indigenous coca production populations have every reason to be indignant about the lack of logic in the contradictory arguments of the Western countries, which maintain that the perverse effects of the drug in their rich societies can be controlled without eradicating the economic, social and moral factors that have engendered one of the West's greatest scourges.

I also started to notice the more subtle aspects of the taste - I could taste the similarity it has to Coca Cola (which now uses de-cocanized coca leaves). When I first sip, I taste the green tea/leafy type taste, and then as I swallow, I taste the coca-cola type taste. It tastes good!

Coca leaves is a densely-leafed plant native to the eastern slopes of the Andes.Erythroxylon coca is widely cultivated in Peru. The leaves are rich in vitamins, protein, calcium,iron and fiber. Chewing coca also counters the symptoms of 'mountainsickness' and oxygen-deprivation.

Stictly speaking, the leaves aren't actually chewed.Typically, the dried coca leaf is moistened with saliva. The wad is placed between the gum and cheek and it is gently sucked. The invigorating juices are swallowed.

Shamans from some traditional andean people still smoke coca leaves for magical purposes. Inhaling the sacred vapours induces a trance-like state. Coca enables a shaman to cross 'the bridge of smoke', enter the world of spirits, and activate his magical powers. Alas the leaves don't travel well; and this ancient usage is uncommon in the urban industrial West

To learn more about cocain ( Click here )

 

Discover the Benefits of The Incas
Sacred Herbs
Mate de Coca
..Order NOW.!!!

ORDER NOW


COCA SOUR ?
If you want to prepare the a delicious Coca Sour just email me I will send FREE the formula but you have to order your Mate de Coca otherwise just think about it.

DRINK MATE DE COCA
Hey if you are planning to visit Machu Picchu do not forget to sweep your Mate de Coca as soon as you arrive to Cusco, just if you want to avoid the Illness altitude sisease.
WARNING
If you drink Mate de Coca your are not a a chloridrate of cocaine addict, Mate Coca it is great. But will not suggest to bring to US some coca leaves with you. Customs and sanitary officers in US do not understand the difference so Forget it
ORDER YOUR MATE DE COCA
 
Coca Tea, pure natural coca leaves
Infusions
How To Preapare IT

An infusion is a method of preparing herbs, usually prepared with boiling water and dried herbs,

Place the dried herb or the filtrant tea bag into a cup then fill the cup or container with boling water and cover it and let it rest for some minutes before drinking. It is better that you don´t use sugar because it may alter the chemical composition of the infusion.

It is necessary to use boiling water and not hot water because only the boiling will accelerate the extraction of the natural nutritional susbtances of the herb.

Do not boil the tea bag or the infusion together or you will loose the medicinal properties of the herb.

The adversaries of Andean culture, who condemn the coca plant, with a glass of whisky in one hand and a cigarette in the other, clamour for its eradication and treat its producers as pariahs should give a plain answer to the following questions: If alcoholism is one of the greatest scourges in Europe and responsible for the slow extermination of the indigenous populations in America, why is the cultivation of the vine not eradicated, even though the vine incarnates one of the elements of the old world's identity? Since the tobacco habit is responsible for a huge number of victims in consumer societies, why is it impossible to prohibit the growing of tobacco? Obviously, no answers will be forthcoming.
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Copyright © 2002 Peruherbals Inc
Disclaimer: The information presented is for information purposes only. It is based on scientific studies or traditional usage. Consult a health care professional before using supplements or making any changes in prescribed medications. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


 

 




Discover the Benefits of The Incas
Sacred Herbs
MATE COCA
.............Order NOW.!!!

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